The provinces and territories of Canada.

(via thereigninglorelai)

claracest:

Didn’t your parents ever warn you about strangers?

Yyyyyes they did.

(via shewhohangsoutincemeteries)

The Wizard of Oz (1939)

(via lipsredasroses)

perksofbeingacauliflour:

SPOILERS AHEAD

Despite an uneven first half, the series finale of How I Met Your Mother brought the show back to its emotional and sentimental core one final time. But the question fans and critics have debating since last night are what did it cost the show to do that? Did the creators’ betray…

Let’s talk about the HIMYM finale.

Unlike most people, I didn’t hate it. I didn’t scream and jump up and down love it, but I was satisfied. Here’s why:

1) One of the major themes of the show is that perfect isn’t always perfect. Ted thinks he’s found perfection a number of different times: with Robin, Victoria, Stella… Each time, she is not what he’s looking for. Barney thinks his womanising life is perfect, until he realizes it’s no longer what he wants. Even Lily and Marshall have their ups and downs, break up, have fights, struggle financially, and aren’t perfect. Perfect isn’t always perfect.

2) The idea some people seem to have gotten that Ted didn’t love The Mother and was just using her as an egg donor is absolutely ludicrous. Of course he did. Tracy is exactly what Ted needed at that moment. He wanted to settle down and have kids. Tracy also wanted that. They were happy together. They loved each other. I believe they would have grown old together. But perfect isn’t always perfect and…

3) …sometimes life gets in the way. This show has never been one to shy away from the heavy themes: Marshall’s dad’s death, Robin’s infertility, Barney’s real, deep-seated insecurities about his father, the mother’s boyfriend’s death. Unfortunately in life, sickness happens. Death happens. And that’s what we saw happen with Tracy. This show has provided us with some real, poignant life lessons, and I don’t think this is any different. I think ending with Ted and Tracy living happily ever after would have been a cop-out and unfair to everything the show tried to portray.

4) Ted is allowed to move on. Isn’t that exactly what Tracy did after her boyfriend died? I think six years is reasonable. I think it’s reasonable that Ted’s children would want him to be happy, and if that means being with another woman (whom they like and even approve of) what’s wrong with that?

5) I don’t believe in the idea of soulmates. I think that a person can have a number of different “soulmates” who are what they need at that time. Robin may have been what Ted wanted in season 1, but not what he needed: they were not on the same page in terms of marriage, kids, or careers. The time wasn’t right for them. Meanwhile, the universe brought Ted and Tracy together at the right time for each of them. They were both prepared to move on from lost loves, and needed to find someone to help them through it. They both wanted to settle down and have kids (I presume, since it happened). They were the right person for each other at that time. When that time ended for them, Robin eventually became the right person for Ted. They had each gone their own ways, Robin pursuing her career like she’d always wanted, Ted enjoying family life, and were able to now come together to meet in the middle. Now they were on the same page. Robin is Ted’s someday person.

6) Ted and Robin kept their promise to each other to be together if they were 40 and still single.

7) While I do agree that Barney’s character development was sort of lost in the finale, I wasn’t incredibly disappointed. Barney changed for Robin, and, just like he did in the past when they broke up, he went back to his womanising ways (Robin incidentally also did what she’d always done after a break up, which was throw herself into her work and travel). I thought that Barney’s revelation with his daughter really opened up the opportunity to explore the concept of how sometimes your children can be exactly who you need.

8) I was frustrated by all the build-up to Barney and Robin’s wedding only to have it torn down in 20 minutes. That sucked. But I never believed it would have worked between them. Barney wanted kids and Robin didn’t (and would never be able to). They were both poor communicators who were stubborn and unwilling to listen. Again, divorce is something that happens in life. It isn’t necessarily because you don’t love each other, but because life just gets in the way. Perfect isn’t always perfect.

9) Why would Ted tell his kids about how Tracy died, or about the funeral, or about how sad he was afterwards? They know about that. They were there. I think it was fitting that the show didn’t focus on that.

10) I loved the blue french horn throw-back. The quintessential symbol of Ted and Robin, it was perfect that that was how they met in the middle, after failed marriages and deaths, children, successful careers, world travel, heartbreak, and pain, with Ted under her window with the blue french horn.

older-andfaraway:

psychofactz:

More Facts on Psychofacts :)

Funny how this industry, that is so often shamed as sexist and anti-feminist, completely subverts genderized wages.

Of course, not that women being better than men is what feminism is about. Don’t get it twisted.

older-andfaraway:

psychofactz:

More Facts on Psychofacts :)

Funny how this industry, that is so often shamed as sexist and anti-feminist, completely subverts genderized wages.

Of course, not that women being better than men is what feminism is about. Don’t get it twisted.

psychofactz:

More Facts on Psychofacts :)

Funny how this industry, that is so often shamed as sexist and anti-feminist, completely subverts genderized wages.

psychofactz:

More Facts on Psychofacts :)

Funny how this industry, that is so often shamed as sexist and anti-feminist, completely subverts genderized wages.